About

The Mapping Territory exhibition is the first collaborative student project run by the National Arts Learning Network (NALN), since it became incorporated into ukadia in 2009. First year undergraduates who progressed to HE through NALN member access initiatives were invited to contribute to demonstrate the diverse breadth of creative practices supported by these programmes. The exhibiting students, now in their second year, have produced new work for this cross-disciplinary exhibition.

These emerging artists have met and collaborated over several months to create an eclectic show that brings together disciplines and geographies. We began the process with a reflection on what the map can offer us. Maps show us the connectedness of things, the networks that join us. They are the world spread out before us, unfolded across a desk, illuminated on our monitors – we can trace them with our fingers or float across them on our screens. They show us the roads we might travel or where we have been. These visual representations of an area, a political or geographical region, reveal the relationships between things. Maps, however, reveal other things: the geographical features that separate us (the mountain ranges, the seas), and the artificial markers of political territories. The borders we may or may not cross.

Scientist and philosopher Alfred Korzybski said ‘the map is not the territory’ – it is an abstraction not the thing itself. It is easy to confuse models of reality with reality itself. But something has changed – we now inscribe the map as we move about with our mobile phones, generating electronic data as we purchase goods, and travel the transport system – the map has become the territory. We are inscribing our personal traces onto the territory. We are collectively mapping our lives.

The work on show in Mapping Territory are representative of the outstanding quality of practices across the member institutions – but what marks out and binds together some of these artists are their journeys into HE. Here the theme of mapping might be understood not only to geographically link these students but also to map out lived experience and a route towards a space for knowledge and creativity.

ukadia is the UK Arts and Design Institutions’ Association, a group of specialist arts and design institutions from across the UK’s higher and further education sector.

Participating institutions: Arts University Bournemouth; Central Saint Martins; Chelsea College of Arts; Cleveland College of Art and Design; Hereford College of Arts; Leeds College of Art; London College of Communication; Ravensbourne; Rose Bruford College

Thanks to: NALN Progression Managers – Pauline Smith, Sylvia Bullock, Eyv Hardwick, Helen Vine, Martell Baines, Dorrie King, Bill Long, Lucy McLeod, Lucy Slater, Samantha Kay, and Kate Hill who all helped to put the building blocks in place.

Other colleagues who have supported us: All the staff at Ravensbourne who have made the staging of the show possible, Pete Smithson at CSM for workshop support, Jefford Horrigan and the technical team for the build, Adrian Phillips for transporting the works, Studio Hato for design, curator Anne Eggebert, Maria Oliver for management, Janey Hagger for project development, and Mark Crawley and UAL for supporting the initiative.

Thanks also to tutors from each college; Phil Beards, Karen Ryan, Sue Ridge, Eyv Hardwick, Celia Johnson, Garry Barker, Susannah Rees, Angie Clark, Samantha Kay, Vicky Wake, Francis Fitzgerald, Claire A Baker. Also Gareth Wadkin, Gavin Waters, and Louise Taylor. And of course to all the artists who are showing work.

NALN was a HEFCE funded lifelong learning network of specialist arts higher education institutions across England, working together to widen participation. When its funding ended in 2009, it became incorporated into the UK Arts and Design Institutions’ Association (ukadia) and members have continued the work which NALN began during its funded period.

ukadia is the United Kingdom Arts and Design Institutions’ Association, a group of specialist arts and design institutions from across the UK’s higher and further education sector. It aims to promote, nationally and internationally, the key contributions of specialist colleges to the UK’s world-renowned reputation in visual arts, performance and the creative and cultural industries and to encourage mobility into professions serving the creative and cultural industries.

Ravensbourne is a world-class higher education institution in London, innovating in digital media and design.

ukadia, NALN, UAL, Ravensbourne

Visit

Tuesday 25 February to
Saturday 1 March 2014

Opening times:
10.00am to 6.00pm Tuesday to Friday, 10.00am to 4.00pm Saturday

Ravensbourne, Penrose Way, Greenwich Peninsula SE10 0EW

Nearest tube: North Greenwich

Device No.3 for the Transitional Realm

Serhan Ahmet-Tekbas with Alice Meyer, Sherief Al Rifa'I and Carlotta Weller
Central Saint Martins
Hackney, London

Statement

The social act of sitting on a public bench and reading a book is a performance that constructs an immaterial space. The installation Device No.3 for the Transitional Realm ritualises and materialises the act of activating this intangible space. Its nomadic qualities empower its users to claim space within the public realm: it disrupts and blurs the ownership of space. This work is a further development from a collaborative project with Alice Meyer, Sherief Al Rifa’I and Carlotta Weller, three of my colleagues on the Central Saint Martins BA Architecture course.

Biography

I am an artist and student of Architecture at Central Saint Martins. I am interested in exploring and decoding the spaces we inhabit and the performing qualities of architecture. My work investigates the various forms transitional spaces take and the ritual processes performed to activate them.

Broken Country

Jahangir Alam and Maceo Stennett-Hughes
Arts University Bournemouth
Sylhet, Bangladesh and London

Statement

When asked to take part in the NALN collaborative project based on the theme ‘mapping territory’ I thought it would be a good idea for me to show my first journey in Bangladesh – which I think meets the theme perfectly. The documentary is split screen – the idea behind this is to offer the audience a different experience of watching a documentary. The documentary contains interviews and voice-overs to guide people through my journey and experiences in Bangladesh. Maceo Stennett-Hughes has collaborated with me on the postproduction of my film.

Biography

Jay Alam: I am studying Digital Media Production at Arts University Bournemouth. This is the first time I have taken part in an exhibition: so far it has been a great experience working on my project and I am really looking forward to the exhibition.
Maceo Stennett-Hughes: I am currently studying Digital Media Production at Arts University Bournemouth. I studied Interactive Media at Richmond Upon Thames College and since graduating I have been gaining experience by helping out on music videos, filming and music production.

Recliner Cathedra

Sarah Binless
Leeds College of Art
Leeds

Statement

Interdisciplinarity is a standpoint exploiting the areas between boundaries, making connections that cross borders. I explore the space between things, looking at what can exist in the tension between divergent concepts embodied in a single object. The chair exists solely as a response to the human form. In Recliner Cathedra the chair as the seat of power is presented as something flaccid; as a symbol of identity it is made formless, as a marker of presence it is made hollow, void. I re-examine our interpretation of the object, unpicking its fabric and meanings to challenge preconceptions and question assumed values.

Biography

Born 1979 Leeds. Sarah Binless is an interdisciplinary artist studying at Leeds College of Art, interested in what can happen where material meets form and how intervention can create meaning. Recent exhibitions include ‘Wool Yorkshire’ – Victoria Quarter, ‘Typosgraphe’ – White Cloth Gallery & The International Artists’ Book Fair.

Samples of Special Places

Abigail Bury
Hereford College of Arts
Coleford, Forest of Dean

Statement

I have taken inspiration from fabric sample books and have created a relational piece of work that collects together fragments of maps chosen by me and by students and tutors. I invited each participant to choose or make one or two fragments of a map that had a special meaning for them – they were then asked to decorate them in whatever way they wanted. The idea was to collect a random selection of decorated maps, each one unique to its creator, to produce a display of maps, colour, pattern, and memories and a collage of happy places.

Biography

BA (Hons) Textile Design mature student at Hereford College of Arts, 2nd year. This is the first time I've entered the education system since completing my A-levels in 1988, in that time I've had several jobs and raised a family.

All Roads lead to Home

Charna Cole
Arts University Bournemouth
Portsmouth

Statement

Everyone is making a journey to get from one moment to the next. My design takes strong visual influences from Portsmouth. The seams for the top dress are the main roads of Portsmouth. These are structured and straight contrasting with the bottom skirt, which is layers of fabrics to represent the sea – the sea is uncontrollable and constantly fights against the city. The garment can be unzipped up to the waist, to represent the destruction time can cause, symbolising the end of Portsmouth, allowing the waves of the sea to break through – the city broken apart at the seams.

Biography

I am a full time student, in my second year of Fashion Design and Technology at Arts University Bournemouth. I live in Waterlooville, near Portsmouth. I have always been interested in the use of clothing to portray someone’s personality and the construction of a garment.

Do not feed the pigeons

Rosie Keane
Chelsea College of Art and Design
Hammersmith, London

Statement

My work comes from an exploration of the bond between personal memory and place, dealing with issues of removal, displacement, and the return and reclamation of memory. Everyday objects, particularly domestic and furniture-based objects often play a central role in inspiring and building my work. In Do Not Feed the Pigeons the benches are landmarks of my journey, my nomadism: a connecting form in mapping the dwellings of the past. They are completely isolated from each other but similar and recognizable in form. They are my memorial benches, each standing for a single located moment in my life.

Biography

I was born in Hammersmith, west London and study BA Fine Art at Chelsea College of Art and Design, University of the Arts London. I’ve previously exhibited a sculptural installation Central Pay Point Instructions at ‘The Last Wash’, Pimlico, 2013.

Wallpaper Patterns from Countryside Walks

Rachel Littlewood
London College of Communication
Romford

Statement

Journeys are often documented through the use of photography, film or by the route being drawn on a map. This brief was an opportunity to discover a new way to document journeys as well as explore an area of art and design I was interested in: pattern making. The journeys used in the creation of this work all took place in the Essex countryside, not because I believed they would produce visually more interesting work, but as I felt it would be nice contrast to the weeks and months I spend in the urban environment of London.

Biography

I am from Romford, and currently studying Design for Graphic Communication at London College of Communication. Although I intend to make a living by pursuing a career in book and publication design, I currently spend my weekends working in retail.

Untangling the Past

Zuzana Marekova
Leeds College of Art
Brezno, Slovakia

Statement

In my work my own personal history often influences me. Slovakia is a country rich in folklore and traditions as is often reflected in my source of inspiration. The work exhibited is a symbolic journey of my life. The past is often hidden in old fabrics and garments, and for this reason I have chosen to use my inherited pieces of crochet doilies and (or) vintage textiles I have found in my work. I see myself as a link between two families and, to pay my respect to the past and the crafts. I have presented my work as a celebration of a lost past.

Biography

I originally come from Slovakia. I live in Leeds where I am currently studying towards a degree in Printed Textiles and Surface Pattern Design at Leeds College of Art.

The Atlas of Thoughts in the Human Body

Emily Marsay
Cleveland College of Art and Design
Stockton-on-Tees

Statement

The theme of this project was thought mapping; relating to mental illness. I focused on dark, depressing thoughts and instantly made the obvious connection to the dark and macabre. Taking inspiration from internal structures of humans, including skeletons and organs, my garment is a form fitting dress, to show how your thoughts can cling and suffocate, with appliqué threads stitching onto the dress, to symbolise veins and how they travel around the body. The rib cage is made from boning and jersey material, to show how thoughts can trap you and cage you in.

Biography

I am currently studying on the BA (Hons) Fashion Enterprise at Cleveland College of Art & Design. I live in North East England with my family. I design and make garments which carry a deep and thought-provoking concept which adds an extra dimension to the work.

Marked Memories

Tracy Newsome
Central Saint Martins
Wood Green, London

Statement

Evidence of mapping and documentation are at the core of my practice. For Marked Memories my starting point involved using Google Earth satellite imagery to view the Earth’s regions and surfaces. I noticed that from afar these marks and textures resembled scars, which in turn resembled the scars on a human subject’s body. Scars are the reminder of events and locations and have a memory attached to each one. Using satellite imagery combined with photography of these locations, streets and buildings, I layered translucent images over the scars, giving these old scars the appearance of a medical procedure – of a stapled or stitched wound.

Biography

I am studying BA Fine Art at Central Saint Martins, UAL. I live in North London and work part-time as a dog walker. In May 2012 my work was shown at the Wellcome Collection as part of a CSM, NALN and Wellcome collaborative project in response to the Wellcome’s ‘Miracles and Charms’ exhibition.

Noise at Work

Anthony Pelham and Zack Warner
Rose Bruford College
Gravesend and Dartford

Statement

When your mind drifts off and the daydream state takes hold, you can find yourself lost in an environment augmented by your sub-conscious. This piece explores that feeling of taking a journey while remaining in the same place. What we aim to do here is to emulate the feeling of being underwater without getting wet and also the experience of going into space without leaving the comfort of your own planet. The idea was a development of a brainstorm of terrains that many have dreamt of visiting but never the opportunity. Explore the space fully to hear things in a different way.

Biography

We are currently studying Performance Sound at Rose Bruford College. The course has us working around the studio and in performance venues perfecting live and recorded media. We both work in a retail environment while living in the surrounding areas of Sidcup.

Tracing the Liminal

Natalie Ramus
Hereford College of Arts
Nelson, South Wales

Statement

My practise is often site-specific; I collect found materials to make installations and interventions in response to a particular environment. For this project I have considered the bed as a site of liminality – associated with birth, death, sleep, sanctuary, recovery, union and conception. I began to collect the traces left by our bodies in the bed; and to make photographic images which document the body between states of wakefulness and sleep. The personal nature of the collection is juxtaposed with the clinical method of display; I am bringing that which is overlooked and transitory into the context of the exhibition.

Biography

I grew up in the Welsh Valleys, left school at 16 into employment and went on to have four children. In 2010 I studied Psychology part-time at Newport University. I’m now in the second year BA (Hons) Fine Art at Hereford College of Art and live with my family in Hay-on-Wye. I’ve previously shown work at Artworkhouse Gallery Abergavenny, 2011.

A Wartime Story

Damion Robinson
London College of Communication
May Pen, Clarendon, Jamaica

Statement

Inspired by stories from WW1 to 2007 from images and narratives at Croydon Museum Social Archive and the Imperial War Museum, I have made a series of twenty postcards through photomontage. Some stories of gassing, bombing and the need to return home are truly sad. I had to look at some of this material more objectively and apply subjective knowledge to them, and I looked at some inspirational artists – Peter Kennard, Raoul Hausmann, Man Ray, Max Ernst, and others. In doing so I was able to generate a new narrative. On the back of each postcard is a small story about what inspired me.

Biography

I am studying a three year degree in Graphics and Media Design. I have lived in London for quite some time, and one thing I always love is the view of the city, the architecture and the stories behind landscape. As this is my first exhibition, I’m excited about the experience.

Hidden Histories

Kate Schofield
Leeds College of Art
Leeds

Statement

Hidden Histories is concerned with the spread of disease in Victorian Leeds. It plays with juxtapositions: the polarity of living conditions between the rich and poor, suggested by combining the beautiful and the "ugly": expensive and luxurious silk with delicate embroidery depicting deadly infections. The idea of the rational and the irrational: John Snow’s emerging germ theory fighting against the prevailing belief that disease was spread by miasma or "bad air". Maps, graphs and statistics turn human lives into abstract figures to be plotted and mapped; scientific knowledge is set against superstition and fear of the unknown.

Biography

Kate Schofield lives and works in Leeds, West Yorkshire, and is currently studying Printed Textiles and Surface Pattern Design at Leeds College of Art. Passionate about combining handcrafting with digital technologies, her work is often focused on medicine, history and the human body.

Reworked Heritage

Melissa Scott
Cleveland College of Art and Design
Tyne and Wear

Statement

The overall theme of this piece is heritage; I looked at my own heritage and home village, which is the small ex-mining village Easington Lane in the North East of England. It’s easy to forget our roots in an age of fast moving technology and changing society. My idea was to use somewhere special and thought “What could be more special than home?” I found a collection of old photographs of my village and my aim is to create something new from the old, as a reflection of how times change and the influence the past will always have.

Biography

I’m studying Textiles and Surface design at Cleveland College of Art and Design and I’m based in Tyne and Wear. I am passionate about pieces of the past and use these as motivation to create innovative designs for textiles and paper based products. I have exhibited fashion fabric samples at Indigo, Paris 2013.

Amber

Owen Smith and
Abigail Taylor
Cleveland College of Art and Design
Stockton

Statement

We each inhabit private moments inaccessible to others. We all live, love and hate alongside everybody else, but we are all hopelessly trapped in the amber of our own moments. To share them, we try in vain to melt that amber. Sensations, from orgasms to broken bones, are private and ultimately incommunicable.  Memories, emotions, insights -- all artifacts of the mind which we can lay out on a table, examine in detail, handle with care. We return from sites and wonders, our words like dust on the bristles of a hand-brush but our experiences themselves are where we left them.

Biography

Owen and Abby both appeared in the early nineties. They lived completely unaware of each other's presence until the random spiraling mess of existence threw them together in a college classroom. They are studying a degree in Graphic Design at CCAD, Hartlepool, and they've got a thing for each other.

Martis

Chris Szkoda
Ravensbourne
Forest Hill, London

Statement

My work is a 5 minute animation piece about London on Mars called Martis. It’s about travelling and exploring some of London’s tourist attractions, but in a London colonised on Mars. I visited different galleries and museums in London to research architectural ideas for futuristic city parts of London. My favourite artists from my research were Marcel Storr who has drawn fantastic massive cathedral towers, and Jan Dagarama Gluszak who has drawn futuristic buildings over normal cities as a montage work.

Biography

My name is Krzysztof Andrej Wladyslaw Szkoda, but most people call me Chris. I’m studying BA (Hons) Animation at Ravensbourne, and I’m very interested in 3D animation films, and video games.

Collection of Found Artifacts

Alex Webb
Chelsea College of Art and Design
Eltham, London

Statement

I own a piece of volcanic rock from Mt. Vesuvius that for me is special. Research into events at Pompeii prompted my work in the style of archaeologists’ plaster casts (plaster poured into ‘moulds’ left in soil by decayed bodies) using materials including alginate, clay, latex, plaster and wax, to create mini sculptural forms. I explored the significance of ‘the story’ of my object, as it could, in fact, be any other rock – I’m interested in what we accept as true when displayed in glass cabinets. In this collection, both acquired and made specifically for this exhibition, real artefacts sit alongside fakes in museum-style vitrines.

Biography

I am a 2nd Year student studying BA Fine Art at Chelsea College of Art and Design. I live in Eltham, South-East London, and vary my practical working time between home and the studios at college. This is the first major exhibition I have been involved in outside of University.

SO 244 364

Rory Zochowski
Hereford College of Arts
Hereford

Statement

I’m passionate about working with my hands, using traditional processes to create contemporary work. As a Blacksmith the conversation between the hot steel and myself through my hammer is a fundamental and fascinating part of my practice, informing the way I think about design and concept. SO 244 364 is inspired by my own travels whilst working throughout the UK. Returning to Herefordshire and seeing Hay Bluff and its iconic profile on the horizon has always filled me with a sense of homecoming. This has inspired me to make a piece that describes the landscape and to articulate a section of that landscape in 3D.

Biography

I am a second year student studying Artist Blacksmithing at Hereford College of Arts. I worked for a traditional oak carpentry and building company for 8 years before returning to study at degree level. I live and work in Herefordshire, dividing my time between college and a forge on Hay Bluff.